1719 William Trent House

Historic Home and Museum

Today’s Colonial History Bits for New Jersey and Mercer County

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What meals were common in Colonial America?

I love the tv show on PBS

“A Taste of History”

“Chef Walter Staib, an award-winning internationally known chef with over four decades of experience, is a master of open hearth cookery. He demonstrates a true mastery in the preparation of sophisticated 18th century cuisine, sure to inspire home-cooks.”

photo and quote from http://www.atasteofhistory.org/

 

 

 

 

 

“BREAKFAST, LUNCH AND DINNER?
Colonial meal structures/times were also different from what we know today. Breakfast was taken early if you were poor, later if you were rich. There was no meal called lunch. Dinner was the mid-day meal. For most people in the 18th century it was considered the main (biggest) meal of the day. Supper was the evening meal. It was usually a light repast. It is important to keep in mind there is no such thing as a “typical colonial meal.” The Royal Governor of Virginia ate quite differently from the first Pilgrim settlers and the West Indians laboring in Philadelphia’s cookshops.”

copied from – http://www.foodtimeline.org/foodcolonial.html#colonialmealtimes

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Visit the William Trent House Museum!  Beautifully restored to the 1719 condition.

http://www.williamtrenthouse.org/

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Written by sallykwitt

August 10, 2011 at 11:21 pm

Today’s Colonial History Bits for New Jersey and Mercer County

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Women’s Fashionable Hair in Colonial America in the 1700’s.

http://www.suite101.com/content/for-colonial-women-high

photo from the article referenced above

The article talks about women using feathers, other decorations, and putting a colonial version of “bumpit” to raise their hair up high!!

 

 

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Visit the William Trent House Museum!  Beautifully restored to the 1719 condition.

http://www.williamtrenthouse.org/

Written by sallykwitt

August 9, 2011 at 9:17 pm

Today’s Colonial History Bits for New Jersey and Mercer County

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Map of the Thirteen Colonies, information on New Jersey

copied from  http://www.personal.psu.edu

New Jersey

  • Year Founded: 1664
  • Founded by: Lord Berkeley and Sir George Carteret
  • Royal Colony: 1702
from http://americanhistory.about.com/od/colonialamerica/a/colonylist.htm

The Duke of York granted some land to Sir George Carteret and Lord John Berkeley who named their colony New Jersey. They provided liberal grants of land and freedom of religion. The two parts of the colony were not united into a royal colony until 1702.

from http://americanhistory.about.com/od/colonialamerica/a/colamoverview_2.htm

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Visit the William Trent House Museum!  Beautifully restored to the 1719 condition.

http://www.williamtrenthouse.org/

Written by sallykwitt

August 8, 2011 at 7:34 pm

Today’s Colonial History Bits for New Jersey and Mercer County

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Things were really hopping in the Delaware Valley area in the early between the mid 1500’s and the 1700’s, even though the settler’s considered the area to be uninhabited.

image from http://etc.usf.edu/clipart/11300/11310/indians_del_11310_md.gif

Here is an excerpt from the Trenton Historical Society website

http://trentonhistory.org/His/colonial.html

The name bestowed upon New Jersey by the Indians was “Shejachbi” (pronounced as if spelled “Sha-ak-bee”). They claimed the whole area comprising New Jersey. Their great chief, Teedyescung, stated at the conference at Easton, Pa., in 1757, that their lands reached eastward from river to sea. When I was a boy I assumed the word “Delaware” to be an Indian name, evolved by the savages themselves and by them bestowed upon the river and bay. Originally, however, it was three words, “De La Warr,” the name of an ancient English family ennobled in the time of Edward II, who reigned from 1307 to 1327. It is undoubtedly of Norman origin. The particular scion of that ancient house for whom the Delaware River and Bay, and the State of Delaware, were named, was Thomas West, Lord De La Warr, born July 9, 1557. It was from the lordly title of this distinguished nobleman and adventurer that we get our present name “Delaware.”

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Visit the William Trent House Museum!  Beautifully restored to the 1719 condition.

http://www.williamtrenthouse.org/

 

Written by sallykwitt

August 7, 2011 at 6:52 pm

Tomorrow, Saturday July 30, Colonial Ice Cream Making!! William Trent House in Trenton, NJ

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Saturday, July 30 at 2pm!!

Colonial Ice Cream Making:  From harvesting ice to moulding of ice cream, this demonstration involves the production of ice cream in a reproduction 18th century sabotiere, or freezing pot. Only documented 18th century flavors are reproduced using original receipts (recipes).   This is a hands-on program for children of all ages.

http://www.williamtrenthouse.org/news.html

 

 

Written by sallykwitt

July 29, 2011 at 12:58 pm

Welcome to the new blog for the William Trent House!

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http://www.williamtrenthouse.org/

15 Market St.
Trenton, NJ 08611
(609) 989-3027

Written by sallykwitt

June 8, 2011 at 5:28 pm